23 9 / 2014

29 5 / 2014

27 3 / 2014

ddddanafuckyou:

laatste
The association of numbers and colours 

ddddanafuckyou:

laatste

The association of numbers and colours 

(Source: l-alcool, via a-synesthetic-world)

10 2 / 2014

a-synesthetic-world:

CS Lewis’s storytelling style (especially in the Narnia books)

a-synesthetic-world:

CS Lewis’s storytelling style (especially in the Narnia books)

09 2 / 2014

a-synesthetic-world:

JRR Tolkien’s writing style

a-synesthetic-world:

JRR Tolkien’s writing style

08 2 / 2014

a-synesthetic-world:

George MacDonald’s writing style
I’m reading Phantastes, which is like one of his best books, and it’s so beautiful!! It’s one of my favorites ever, and I’m halfway through it.
He’s the father of modern fantasy, like without him, there would be no Narnia, Harry Potter, Lord of The Rings, and even Alice in Wonderland. You guys should check him out

This is legit. George MacDonald's prose style is old-fashioned and sometimes overwrought to a modern ear, but The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie were huge formative influences for me. (Also The Lost Princess and The Golden Key and Other Stories, and to a lesser extent At The Back of the North Wind. Not so much his adult fantasy books Lilith or Phantastes, which I disliked as a teen and have yet to re-read, but that’s just me.)
The OP isn’t kidding about his influence on Narnia and LotR, either. If you’re a Tolkien fan and you haven’t read The Princess and the Goblin, for instance, you may well be surprised by how much of it seems familiar… 

a-synesthetic-world:

George MacDonald’s writing style

I’m reading Phantastes, which is like one of his best books, and it’s so beautiful!! It’s one of my favorites ever, and I’m halfway through it.

He’s the father of modern fantasy, like without him, there would be no Narnia, Harry Potter, Lord of The Rings, and even Alice in Wonderland. You guys should check him out

This is legit. George MacDonald's prose style is old-fashioned and sometimes overwrought to a modern ear, but The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie were huge formative influences for me. (Also The Lost Princess and The Golden Key and Other Stories, and to a lesser extent At The Back of the North Wind. Not so much his adult fantasy books Lilith or Phantastes, which I disliked as a teen and have yet to re-read, but that’s just me.)

The OP isn’t kidding about his influence on Narnia and LotR, either. If you’re a Tolkien fan and you haven’t read The Princess and the Goblin, for instance, you may well be surprised by how much of it seems familiar… 

02 2 / 2014

Anonymous said: As a synesthete and an asexual person, THANK YOU for Alison and Tori. They showed me I was not strange and not alone.

That is a lovely and heartening thing to hear, Anon. Thank you so much!

29 1 / 2014

rockinlibrarian replied to your post “I think I might have synaesthesia, but idk. …”

I think I have a vivid imagination. So many of these things I can say “I know what you mean!” about, but I don’t know if I really do or I just imagine that I could. Definitely seems to be in my brain rather than actual perception…

Well, there are two kinds of synesthesia: associative and projected. Associative is actually quite a bit more common, meaning that the majority of synesthetes do not actually SEE colours and shapes floating before their eyes or superimposed on the letters and numbers they read, but rather their minds persistently associate a colour or texture or smell or taste with certain graphemes or sounds.

Real synesthesia is consistent over time, however, and doesn’t require concentrated thought because the associations are ingrained and automatic. So if you have to ponder what personality or gender or colour or taste the number 3 might have, then you’re probably not a synesthete. But if someone asks “What direction is Tuesday?” and without stopping to think about it you immediately point up and to your left (or whatever), you likely do have synesthesia.

Those are just examples, of course. There are many different kinds of synesthesia, and no two synesthetes’ impressions or associations are exactly alike. For more information, I highly recommend checking out the excellent Tumblr a-synesthetic-world!

29 1 / 2014

Anonymous said: I think I might have synaesthesia, but idk. I feel the texture of sounds, if that makes sense? And some songs also have colour but I don't notice it (like I'm used to it or something), I used to just tell myself "nah it's just how you visualize". For texture, distorted electronic noise in a song is itchy(?), and some noise is like poking, stabbing, tickles, etc. For colours, I see a lot of industrial rock as black and purple, and Coldplay's music is usually ice blue, etc. Is this synaesthesia?

Definitely! Both Sound -> Texture and Sound -> Colour are well documented forms of synesthesia. If you’d like to test yourself online and see what other types of synesthesia you may have, check out the Synesthesia Battery.

25 1 / 2014

concertoinc4 said: So I am finally beginning to realize the extent of my synaesthesia. When I hear music, I see it in colors. Like "Bulletproof" by Kerli (so pretty) is blue and black. I also associate numbers and music notes with certain colors. IT'S LIKE THE MOST USELESS SUPERPOWER.

*is fiercely envious of your so-called useless superpowers*